The Grow Behind Kind Love


In this Growers Spotlight, we interview Idan Spitz, Chief Cultivation Officer of Kind Love, about the grow and his experience working with Kind Love.

The following is an interview with industry experts. Growers Network does not endorse nor evaluate the claims of our interviewees, nor do they influence our editorial process. We thank our interviewees for their time and effort so we can continue our exclusive Growers Spotlight service.

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  • Growing Style
  • The Kind Love Experience
  • Resources
  • Comments

  • Abbreviated Article


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    Growing Style


    Tell us about the space you’re using to grow.

    We’re an all-indoors hydro grow, measuring around 80,000 square feet currently. We grow indoors because that’s the only way that you’ll get the best quality cannabis. You can grow outdoors and get some acceptable cannabis, but the best stuff can only come when you are able to control every variable. We’re also currently in the process of expanding. A new facility is under construction which should give us a lot of options for growing.

    The Kind Love store is in Denver on Alameda Avenue, but the grow itself is northeast of Denver.


    Tell me about the plants you’re growing.

    We carry over six dozen strains. Some are proprietary strains that we grow to flower, and the others are sold commercially as clones. Over 30 strains are produced to be sold as clones, and we’re one of the bigger clone stores in Denver, as we can crank out about 10,000 per month right now. We may soon expand to 30,000 clones a month with the new facility.


    What’s the difference between propagation for resale and propagation for flowering?

    We maintain two separate systems for cloning and flowering.

    Plants we intend to grow to all the way to flowering are put into an aeroponic system. Aeroponically grown plants are healthier and stronger, but take longer and require more attention.

    The clones we grow for resale are placed into jiffy cubes with a nutrient medium, allowing them to grow quickly and relatively easily.


    Tell me about your growing equipment.


    Environmental Control


    We use Stulz HVAC units to control both temperature and RH. We manually control light levels by changing ballast wattages, and we’re looking to add a fertigation system and automation for the entire grow.
    Lights

    We’re currently in the process of changing our lights. Right now we’re using 1000W single-ended HPS lights. We’re switching to double-ended HPS lights and LEDs. DE HPS has a high PPFD output and a more favorable grow spectrum than single-ended, and LED lights give you the ability to control the spectrum relatively precisely, which is great for the photoreceptor enzymes that modify gene expression in plants.

    Media and Nutrients

    Veg and flowering grow in coco coir. We have a comprehensive protocol for nutrients depending on the strain and the current part of the cycle the plant is in. While our mix is proprietary, we do use New Millennium Nutrients and Botanicare.


    What’s your approach to Pest Management?

    We’re restricted heavily on what pesticides we can use, and we can only apply a few things. Therefore, our number one approach is to keep everything away that might infect the plants. Thus we have a very stringent cleanliness policy. Employees who work with the plants are required to take showers in the morning, and put on scrubs and shoes that have never left the facility. Visitors are not allowed in the grow rooms, and must wear booties at all times in the grow space.

    The main pests we deal with are typical to Colorado. These include:

    1. Spider Mites
    2. Grubs
    3. Root Aphids
    4. Thrips
    5. Mealybugs
    6. Powdery Mildew

    Should we ever encounter any of these pests, we have a scorched-earth policy. The infected plant is immediately removed and other plants it may have come into contact are closely inspected. We sanitize the room from top to bottom after each grow goes through.

    If you like the abbreviated article, let us know in the survey at the bottom of the article! We’re always interested in hearing your feedback.

    If you want to read more, you can read the full article below.


    Growing Style


    We’re an all-indoors hydro grow, measuring around 80,000 square feet currently. We grow indoors because that’s the only way that you’ll get the best quality cannabis. You can grow outdoors and get some acceptable cannabis, but the best stuff can only come when you are able to control every variable. We’re also currently in the process of expanding. A new facility is under construction which should give us a lot of options for growing.

    The Kind Love store is in Denver on Alameda Avenue, but the grow itself is northeast of Denver.

    The dispensary and crew.
    We carry over six dozen strains. Some are proprietary strains that we grow to flower, and the others are sold commercially as clones. Over 30 strains are produced to be sold as clones, and we’re one of the bigger clone stores in Denver, as we can crank out about 10,000 per month right now. We may soon expand to 30,000 clones a month with the new facility.

    Some of the clones.
    We maintain two separate systems for cloning and flowering.

    Plants we intend to grow to all the way to flowering are put into an aeroponic system. Aeroponically grown plants are healthier and stronger, but take longer and require more attention.

    The clones we grow for resale are placed into jiffy cubes with a nutrient medium, allowing them to grow quickly and relatively easily.


    Environmental Control

    We use Stulz HVAC units to control both temperature and RH. We manually control light levels by changing ballast wattages, and we’re looking to add a fertigation system and automation for the entire grow.


    Lights

    We’re currently in the process of changing our lights. Right now we’re using 1000W single-ended HPS lights. We’re switching to double-ended HPS lights and LEDs. DE HPS has a high PPFD output and a more favorable grow spectrum than single-ended, and LED lights give you the ability to control the spectrum relatively precisely, which is great for the photoreceptor enzymes that modify gene expression in plants.


    Media and Nutrients

    Veg and flowering grow in coco coir. We have a comprehensive protocol for nutrients depending on the strain and the current part of the cycle the plant is in. While our mix is proprietary, we do use New Millennium Nutrients and Botanicare.

    We’re restricted heavily on what pesticides we can use, and we can only apply a few things. Therefore, our number one approach is to keep everything away that might infect the plants. Thus we have a very stringent cleanliness policy. Employees who work with the plants are required to take showers in the morning, and put on scrubs and shoes that have never left the facility. Visitors are not allowed in the grow rooms, and must wear booties at all times in the grow space.

    The main pests we deal with are typical to Colorado. These include:

    1. Spider Mites
    2. Grubs
    3. Root Aphids
    4. Thrips
    5. Mealybugs
    6. Powdery Mildew

    Should we ever encounter any of these pests, we have a scorched-earth policy. The infected plant is immediately removed and other plants it may have come into contact are closely inspected. We sanitize the room from top to bottom after each grow goes through.


    The Kind Love Experience

    Finding quality people and keeping them is a challenge.Idan Spitz

    Honestly, my biggest challenge has not come from the grow, but from the people who work in the industry. I’ve had a lot of encounters with some very unprofessional people, and I found out just why the stereotype against stoners exists. I come from the world of academia, and I’m used to working with professors and undergraduates who tend to be more reliable. Finding quality people and keeping them is a challenge, and much of my work has centered around teambuilding and heading off negative patterns.

    We’ve earned a great reputation, and we’re known for our extracts and clones. We won several awards for multiple years in a row from Westword. We won for our Alien Rock Candy, and we’ll hopefully win for our Larry OG this year to get our 3rd consecutive win. We’ve also won multiple awards from the Cannabis Business Awards.
    We’re adding more space to the facility. There will be more room for moms, and a space for breeding, which I’m looking forward to. I spent a lot of time breeding plants for my degrees, and now I can do it with cannabis.
    The main difference is that I can’t get away with the stuff I might normally do at home. Even moving a plant to a different location than planned in the dispensary might require three separate signatures. Bureaucracy is a real hassle sometimes.
    I have a background in biofuels. I got a Masters of Science in Biology from the University of Illinois and I was working on a PhD in biofuels prior to my work with Kind Love. I worked on breeding with a variety of tall grasses, including sugarcane. About halfway through my PhD work, I got sick of Illinois. I took a break, and started working for Kind Love. Two and a half years later, I found that I’m still enjoying my work here.

    As for how I got started growing cannabis, I started back when I was in college. I got a bag of Bubblegum with seeds in it, and said what the hell. I started growing it in fluorescent lights and it took off since then.



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    Want to get in touch with Kind Love?

    You can reach them via the following methods:

    1. Website: https://mmjdenver.net/
    2. Phone: 303-565-3600
    3. Email: [email protected]


    Do you have any questions or comments?

    Feel free to post below!


    About the Author

    Hunter Wilson is a community builder with Growers Network. He graduated from the University of Arizona in 2011 with a Masters in Teaching and in 2007 with a Bachelors in Biology.